Educational services offered by UPEACE The Hague in 2013-2014

Finished July 01, 2014
In the academic year 2013-2014 UPEACE The Hague has contributed to the educational curriculum of the International Public Management programme of The Hague University of Applied Sciences. Its 1st and 2nd year bachelor students were offered a variety of research based courses in Peace and Conflict Studies:

 

Transforming War Economies (2nd year course)

11 September – 15 November 2013

 

Course Convenor: Caecilia van Peski, MA, Senior Expert Democratization and Elections

Teaching Assistant: Anouk Soomers

 

Policymakers are dealing with a great number of challenges in facing war economies (including oil, diamonds, drug and human trafficking, prostitution and consumer goods). In fact, conflict financing connects to human rights abuse and global trade. This course studies the relevant policy areas and policy options in order to understand and transform war economies. What policy efforts have been developed to limit or regulate the trade in conflict condition?

 

Fragile Peace Agreements (2nd year course)

18 November 2013 – 7 February 2014

 

Course Convenor: Dr. Daniela Ingruber, Associate Professor in Media, Peace and Conflict Studies, University for Peace Costa Rica

Teaching Assistant: Anouk Soomers

 

A number of civil wars end with a signed peace agreement as the main result of negotiations. However, peace agreements may break down before the key provisions are implemented. In addition, problems will usually arise after the formal signing. Moreover, the implementation of peace agreements is difficult. Such developments are often followed by recurrence of the conflict. This course analyses the main obstacles to reaching peace agreements: it analyses stalled peace dialogues; stagnant peace processes; the precarious character and long history of broken peace agreements; and the overall lack of confidence in peace. Potential drivers of disruption of peace agreements will be identified. This course advances students’ knowledge and understanding of concepts, theories, analytical tools, methods, and datasets in this area. Students will develop a set of their own hypotheses on the fragility of peace agreements.

Peace, Negotiation and Mediation (2nd year course)

18 November 2013 – 7 February 2014

 

Course Convenor: Dr. Daniela Ingruber, Associate Professor in Media, Peace and Conflict Studies, University for Peace Costa Rica

 

This course focuses on how armed conflicts end and offers insight in various conflict resolution methods. What is the influence of international negotiation and mediation on conflict termination? What are the effects of negotiated settlements or third party mediation on stable outcomes? What are the difficulties of getting states and various non-state actors at the negotiation table? Moreover, what is the impact of including or excluding actors on the outcome of negotiations and civil war duration? Such key questions are taken up in this course. Different civil war contexts are analysed, including for example the Sudans (the Abyei border-conflict resolution) and Sierra Leone. Several databases will be introduced, such as the UCDP Conflict Termination Dataset and the Civil Wars Mediation Dataset (CWM). At the end of the course, students have built a strong analytical framework as a basis for interpreting and assessing conflict resolution.

 

Civil War and Conflict Studies (1st year course)

18 February – 25 April 2014

 

Course ConvenorDr. Rens C. Willems, Research Fellow UPEACE The Hague

 

What is civil war? When does a civil war begin or end? How to understand the “new wars”? Identifying the cause of civil war, or studying the dynamics of a civil war, is subject of much debate in conflict studies. Factors that are generally taken to characterise the “new wars” are mostly seen as different from traditional warfare, including the involvement of non-state armed actors and rebel groups, new forms of financing, and the deliberate targeting of civilians. This course takes up the main challenges of studying civil war and contemporary conflict trends, with a particular focus on the onset, severity and termination of civil war.

 

Human Rights and Conflict Resolution (1st year course)

28 April – 11 July 2014

 

Course Convenor: Dr. Rens C. Willems, Research Fellow UPEACE The Hague

 

The overall purpose of this course is to explore the main topics involved in the interaction between human rights and conflict resolution. The course offers a composite picture of the various intersections between human rights and conflict, lays out the actors and issues, and analyses the dynamics and dilemmas involved. Special attention will be given to analyses and insights that represent recent changes in the field of armed conflict and human rights.

 

International Peacebuilding (1st year course)

28 April – 11 July 2014

 

Course Convenor: Dr. Rens C. Willems, Research Fellow UPEACE The Hague

 

This course examines the connection between peacebuilding and statebuilding in fragile political orders. It is widely assumed that armed conflict and civil war mainly occur in conditions of state fragility and lacking state performance, for which terms are being used ranging from “failing” or “failed” states to “weak” or “collapsed” states. State fragility has become a key issue of academic debate and is considered a most relevant international policy challenge. However, are “fragile” and “failed” states sound and viable categories for analysis? The difficulty with the fragile states discourse is that it tends to be normative, and mainly focuses on the deficiencies and shortcomings of governance. This will be further explored in the course.

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